NAME

cxInWdgtDisable - disable a widget of a parameter port
#include <cx/UI.h>

void cxInWdgtDisable(const char *portName)
subroutine cxInWdgtDisable(portName)
character *(*) portName
portName
Name of the parameter port whose widget will be disabled.
cxInWdgtDisable is an IRIS Explorer Widget Library call used within modules to disable a widget associated with a parameter. A disabled widget has a grayed-out appearance and does not respond to input events. Thus, the widget attached to the parameter port portName will be not operate after this call is made.

This routine and its companion, cxInWdgtEnable(3E), can be used to make the appearance of module control panels context sensitive.

Advanced module writers occasionally create their own widget hierarchies using cxXtAreaInitialize() and cxXtAreaAttach(). Calling cxInWdgtDisable on the parameter associated with such a hierarchy will have no effect since the IRIS Explorer UI widget is unrelated (in a parent-child sense) to the user-created widget hierarchy.

It is an error to pass the function a portName that is not a parameter port with a widget.

Some widgets, notably dials, have a very subtle gray-out effect. It is thus hard to notice that such widgets have been disabled.

Individual components of widgets can not be disabled (items in an option menu, for instance).

A bug can occur when the user is manipulating a widget while a module is disabling it. This bug has been observed in pushbuttons. The result is that the lighting effect that makes a button look pushed in is reversed. The state of the buttons lighting model remains reversed until the button is pushed again.

Though disabling a widget keeps the user from sending new data values to a module parameter through the disabled widget, nothing keeps the user from sending new values down to a parameter from an upstream widget that is wired into a parameter whose widget has been disabled.

cxInWdgtEnable(3E)
Last modified: Mon Nov 6 16:33:23 GMT 2000
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© The Numerical Algorithms Group Ltd, Oxford UK. 1999